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Tag: Mental health

Isolation Stress-Relief Guide From Ministry of Hemp

Posted in Journalism, and Ministry of Hemp

Over at Ministry of Hemp, I teamed up with some of my coworkers to create a Hemp-Powered Isolation Self Care Guide.

Virtual Gonzo Zine Library, Spring 2020: Resistance Under A Pandemic

Posted in Zines

Welcome to the Virtual Gonzo Zine Library. The VGZL is a quarterly zine reading list and miniature zine distro. A few times per year, I curate some of my favorite zines — zines that I think everyone should be reading, including myself.

This is the very first edition. I tried to pick zines which felt topical to this moment of pandemic, and could help inspire, comfort, and give us new perspectives. I selected a mixture of the very practical and the theoretical, but I tried to focus on zines written in an accessible way that wasn’t overly academic.

I’m dividing this edition of the Zine Library into a main selection and bonus content. The main selection is my reading list for the quarter, while the rest are other zines I think you might find interesting.

Life in Isolation (& Gonzo Zine Library Update)

Posted in Journalism, Life, and Zines

It’s time again for me to say THANK YOU to everyone that supports my work on Patreon. Thanks to your help, I’ve been able to continue work on the Virtual Gonzo Zine Library. Read on for a little bit more about that below.

I want to be transparent about my mental health, because I think it’s helpful for others to know they’re not alone in this.

I’ve struggled my whole life with depression. After watching “The Babadook,” I think of depression like the monster in my personal basement. Always there, in my life, but hopefully part of the background most of the time as long as I take care of myself… but occasionally, escaping it’s home in the basement to spend a few days in the foreground of my consciousness. For the most part, I try to love myself and let it pass.

Study: Out of 2,400 CBD Users, 42 Percent Gave Up Pharmaceutical Drugs

Posted in Journalism, and Ministry of Hemp

A new study shows that many consumers are giving up conventional pharmaceutical drugs in favor of CBD.

CBD, or cannabidiol, is one of dozens of cannabinoids found in hemp, but unlike THC it doesn’t cause people to get “high.”

In a study released in early August, market-research firm Brightfield Group surveyed 2,400 registered users of Hello MD, a medical cannabis education and advocacy website. One of the study’s most dramatic findings is that 42 percent of people who use CBD report that they’ve given up pharmaceutical drugs in favor of cannabis in some form. This figure includes both strains of psychoactive cannabis, a.k.a. “marijuana,” with high levels of CBD and CBD-only products like CBD oil supplements made from industrial hemp.

The Science Behind Using CBD Oil For Schizophrenia

Posted in Journalism, and Ministry of Hemp

Even as “true believers” in hemp, sometimes we’re still surprised to learn all the ways cannabidiol (CBD) can help.

Though we know that CBD supplements are used by people with everything from anxiety to arthritis, that was still the case when we first saw reports that it may also be an antipsychotic.

Considered one of several “psychotic disorders,” schizophrenia is a mental illness associated with serious distortions in a person’s thinking, which can include hallucinations or hearing voices. Other symptoms often include depression and difficulty maintaining interest in social activities and hobbies. While conventional pharmaceutical treatments often help, they also often have unpleasant side effects.

Death Of Paul Castaway Highlights Denver’s Overlooked Police Brutality Problem

Posted in Journalism, and MintPress News

The death of a Rosebud Sioux man in Denver earlier this month is a painful reminder that police shootings are not limited to any one part of the United States, and certainly not just to places that received mainstream media attention after recent killings.

On July 12, Lynn Eagle Feather called police for help with her schizophrenic son, Paul Castaway. Witnesses and police give conflicting accounts of an incident that quickly spiraled out of control. Officers shot Castaway multiple times while he held a knife to his own neck. He died the following day at an area hospital. Police say they shot in self-defense, but witnesses and Castaway’s family disagree.

As his family struggles for justice, a diverse coalition of protesters from the American Indian Movement to local groups like Denver Community Defense Committee are working with the families of the victims of Denver police brutality. They’re hoping to draw attention to a largely overlooked epidemic of police violence that rivals other cities like Baltimore or New York City for its ability to destroy lives. Now, police are targeting activists and journalists who support them with arrests and even violence.